Entry

Hong-wu: Year 3, Month 1, Day 10

6 Feb 1370

Next Entry >>
<< Previous Entry

Envoys were sent to Annam, Korea and Champa to carry out sacrifices to the mountains and rivers of those countries. Previously, the Emperor had observed abstinence in various respects and had personally compiled the sacrificial text. On this day, the Emperor held an audience and provided the envoys with incense and silks. The incense was contained in gold boxes. The silks comprised one length of silk and two pennants of patterned fine silk. All were in the colours of the four directions (方色). The sacrificial tablets were personally signed by the Emperor with his Imperial name. The Emperor also gave twenty-five liang of silver and presented sacrificial materials. Ten liang of silver as well as robes were conferred upon the envoys and they were then sent off. It was ordered that each country map its mountains and rivers, copy its inscriptions and record its population, and that these records be given to the envoy to bring back. When the envoys reached the countries, they were to engrave the event in stone. The wording was to be as follows:

"Through reliance on Heaven and Earth and the concern and assistance of my ancestors, I now stand above my subjects. I dare not ignore the state sacrifices or the sacrifices to the mountains, towns, seas and rivers. Recently, Champa, Annam and Korea have sent envoys to present memorials and declare themselves subjects. I have enfeoffed their kings, and the mountains and rivers within the borders of these countries are all now subject to the office of the zhi-fang. We find in the Institutes of antiquity that the Son of Heaven makes sacrifices to the mountains and rivers. Although these extend to all, it has never been the case that envoys were sent to offer sacrifices within their territories. Now I wish all under Heaven to enjoy peaceful rule. Thus, I have provided sacrificial animals and silk offerings and have sent envoys to sacrifice to the spirits. The spirits will be pleased and will thus guard the king of the country, protect the land generation after generation, and ensure that weather is timely and harvests are bountiful. Thereby the people will be at peace. In order to demonstrate my will of looking on all equally, this is carved in stone. Thus it can be passed down to posterity."

Tai-zu: juan 48.4b-5a

Zhong-yang Yan-jiu yuan Ming Shi-lu, volume 3, page 0954/55

Next Entry >>
<< Previous Entry

Preferred form of citation for this entry:

Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/reign/hong-wu/year-3-month-1-day-10, accessed November 15, 2019