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Wan-li: Year 34, Month 2, Day 5

13 Mar 1606

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Li Wei-xin, the son of the Annam Commander Li Wei-tan, offered tribute of local products and requested enfeoffment. The Lis reigned for seven generations from Li Li to [Li] Hui, who had his position usurped by his minister Mo Deng-yong. The Mos' rule extended for over 50 years. Hui's son Ning continued to carry out the sacrifices for the Li ancestors at the Qi-ma River. This remained so for four generations until Wei-tan who, with his minister Zheng Song, made coordinated plans, raised troops and punished the Mos. He restored everything as it was in the past, and then presented a figure of gold representing himself and requested orders from the Court. An Imperial command was issued appointing him as Commander and requiring that a seal be cast and provided to him. That occurred in the 25th year of the Wan-li reign (1597/98). Two years later, Wei-tan died and his son [Li] Wei-xin became ruler. He did not advise of the death or request permission to offer tribute. Subsequently, Wei Da-li (Alt: Chang Da-li), a yi official of that country, induced the chieftain Lu You and others to attack Si-ling and carry off the official seal. The Court deliberated and then sent a despatch of reprobation, requiring that country to capture Lu You and present him. Da-li repented his offences, returned the official seal and captured 18 spies in atonement for his crimes. It was commanded that he be allowed to begin anew. At this time, Wei-xin sent the yi houseman Du Wen-zhen and others to knock at the gate and request permission to offer tribute. This was seven years after he had assumed his post. He explained that he indeed was the due legitimate heir and that initially, as the country's situation had been unsettled and, domestically, the refractory bandit Pan Yan had been engaged in rebellion, he had been unable to advise of the death or request permission to offer tribute. As Wei Da-li (Alt: Chang Da-li) had acted rebelliously and he was afraid that he would be reprimanded for allowing such occurrences, Wei-xin at this time had the chieftain Zheng Song and others personally bring all the formerly-issued bronze seals to be handed over in exchange for the requested silver seal. However, unexpectedly, Pan Yan intercepted and attacked him, leading to the seals being lost in the Shou-chang River. He expressed a desire to provide 100 jin to compensate for them. The Guang-xi Grand Coordinator Yang Fang advised of the matter. An Imperial command was sent to the Ministry of War requiring it to engage in detailed deliberation and to report.

Shen-zong: juan 418.3a-b

Zhong-yang Yan-jiu yuan Ming Shi-lu, volume 114, page 7889/90

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Preferred form of citation for this entry:

Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/reign/wan-li/year-34-month-2-day-5, accessed November 15, 2019