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Yong-le: Year 16, Month 2, Day 20

27 Mar 1418

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Previously, Che San, the son of Che Mian, the deceased native-official county magistrate in Si-mang County in Jia-xing Subprefecture, Jiao-zhi, and others had rebelled, killing the circulating-official county magistrate Ou-yang Zhi and others. The Feng-cheng Marquis Li Bin, regional commander of Jiao-zhi, sent the Vice Commissioner-in-chief Fang Zheng to lead troops to punish them. The bandits opposed them with their forces and the native-official Commissioner Chen Ru-shi and Battalion Commander Zhu Duo-pu were killed. The Imperial army fought back strongly and greatly defeated the bandits. The younger brother Che Dao and others were captured and then killed, while Che San escaped with his followers. The government troops sought for them, but due to the impenetrability of the mountain forests and the fact that the miasmic vapours were rising, the army was unsuccessful in capturing them. Accordingly, the troops were withdrawn, and people were sent to instruct the bandits to surrender. Bin informed of the events and requested permission to reward the families of Ru-shi and so on, in order to strengthen morale. This was approved. Ru-shi had his origins in Nan-ce and formerly was a junior lieutenant under the Chens. When the government troops went on expedition to the South, he was one of the first to return to allegiance. In punishing the bandits and in bringing people to surrender, he accumulated great successes. He was successively promoted through posts to assistant commissioner. When pursuing the rebellious bandit Che San, he pushed deep into the bandit ranks, whereupon he was struck by an arrow which felled him from his horse and resulted in his death. Duo-pu had his origins in Dong-an County in Bei River Prefecture and was also appointed to an official post for his military successes. Together with Ru-shi, he bravely engaged in killing bandits, but was injured and subsequently died. The Emperor ordered that the Ministry of Rites send a Messenger to confer rice and cloth for the funeral sacrifices and also ordered that the ministry arrange for the local authorities to construct a tomb.

Tai-zong: juan 197.2a

Zhong-yang Yan-jiu yuan Ming Shi-lu, volume 13, page 2063

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Preferred form of citation for this entry:

Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/reign/yong-le/year-16-month-2-day-20, accessed October 17, 2019