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Hong-wu: Year 22, Month 11, Day 11

28 Nov 1389

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Yang Da-yong, a registrar in the Office of Transmission, was ordered to go as an envoy to the Bai-yi. Initially, Si Lun-fa of the Bai-yi had attacked Mo-sha-le and Ding-bian and the Xi-ping Marquis Mu Ying had led troops in punishing him. In all of his efforts to wage battles of defiance, Si Lun-fa was defeated. Then he sent his local commanders and pacifiers to Yun-nan to advise that plans for rebellion in the past had not been his, and rather had been hatched by his subordinates Dao Si-lang and Dao Si-yang. He requested that his crimes be forgiven and advised willingness to offer tribute. The Yun-nan regional officials advised of this. The Emperor thus sent Da-yong to take Imperial orders with which to instruct Si Lun-fa. The orders read: "Lu-chuan is secluded in the South-west, 10,000 li in the distance. It is not in China's maps. Why is Lu-chuan alone like this? Like in Yun-nan's territory, the roads are precipitous, the people make their lairs on cliffs and have to drink their water from the springs and rivers below. They have animal form and yi appearance and their ways are lacking in moral principles. Formerly, the Yuan sent the evil Liang Prince to Yun-nan. He did not follow the ways of Heaven, induced troubles and disturbances, beguiled those on our borders and concealed those who committed crimes. He also deceived foolish people into engaging in rebellion. This affected good people and thus, although the region was wild and distant and although the people were beyond culture, there was no option but to engage in an expedition against him. Therefore, I ordered the "General for Subduing the South" Fu You-de to take 300,000 armoured troops to proceed there to punish his crime. Thereby Yun-nan was pacified. Only you, Si Lun-fa, have imitated and surpassed the Liang Prince. You have taken in our fugitives and have done so for several years. The Jin-chi and Jing-dong campaigns resulted from your actions. I said that you sought more people and wanted to expand your territory, that you wanted to challenge China and it was thus that you dared to create trouble. Therefore I ordered the skilled generals to lead their troops to establish camps and fields where they could both plant crops and protect our territory. Now, you have come and claimed that the previous violations on the border were not your doing but rather the acts of Dao Si-lang and so on. I have not examined whether this is so or not. Although you have expressed allegiance and sincerity, your heart certainly still remains rebellious. This being so, how can I assuage the anger of the various generals? If you want to get rid of the anger, you should personally carry out the rites of a subject and repay all the costs which the troops incurred in the past. Thereby, Lu-chuan will not be subject to the crime-punishing army and the native officials will all be guaranteed prosperity for generations. If you do not act thus, the army's banners and standards will proceed towards you and all will be eliminated." When Da-yong reached Lu-chuan, Si Lun-fa listened to the orders and subsequently sent elephants, horses, silver and local products in tribute to admit guilt. Da-yong also instructed Si Lun-fa to pursue and capture the fugitive Yun-nan rebellious bandit Zi-chu and one other as well as the local commander Dao Si-lang and others, a total of 137 persons. The Bai-yi were thus pacified.

Tai-zu: juan 198.2a-b

Zhong-yang Yan-jiu yuan Ming Shi-lu, volume 7, page 2969/70

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Preferred form of citation for this entry:

Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/reign/hong-wu/year-22-month-11-day-11, accessed November 20, 2019