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Tian-qi: Year 4, Month 10, Day 18

28 Nov 1624

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The Liang-chao cong-xin lu records: The troops sent by the Fu-jian Grand Coordinator Nan Ju-yi defeated and drove off the "red yi", burnt their walls, presented prisoners and memorialized victory. His memorial read as follows: "The spying on Peng-hu by the 'red yi' began with Wei-ma-lang, and had been going on for quite a period. At that time, we had good generals who could awe them with words, and they were able to achieve victory through their eloquence. However, this time, when the 'red yi' came to Peng-hu, it was not a single chieftain. The fan forces numbered in the thousands. They built walls and seized the place and it appeared that their intent was to stay a long time. They nibbled at our territory, trying to expand their area of control and constantly engaged in overbearing and hostile actions. The seas and heavens were all stained by their noxious influences, and the mountains and rivers of Fu-jian and Guang-dong became blood-soaked areas. The safety or otherwise of the country depends on the security of this part of the border. Strength or weakness is contingent on the Imperial spirit and the Emperor. Fortunately, there has been secret assistance from the Imperial ancestors and the generals and officials have acted with one heart and mind. They righteously plunged their oars into the sea and vowed that they would eliminate [the invaders] before breakfast. In the past, in the Central-left Battalion campaign, half [of the invaders] were killed or captured. Now, the Peng-hu force has swept them completely away. It has been over three months since we built a fort and established a military encampment. They were indeed like fish swimming in a cooking pot. Ten-plus ships fled after their walls were destroyed and there are now no more rats left in the lair. We left a route by which they could escape to show the liberality of the Court. The territory has been recovered and the country has been strengthened. The Imperial majesty frightened and shook them and spiritual might was powerfully flourished. Great efforts were put into deciding the expeditionary plans and the military commission protected the lives of the forces. We exerted ourselves in fulfilling this important task and fortunately were able to be of a little service. We were willing to sacrifice ourselves to achieve the restoration of peace and served the Emperor in resolving his concerns in the south. This is respectfully advised through urgent courier. It is known that the Emperor will be pleased." Note: Fu-jian had long been subject to yi calamities, but formerly they came on the seas and if they attacked a city and engaged in plunder, they could be routed and pursued. However, then they occupied the Peng-hu islands and built walls and the situation remained thus for three years. They thereby had a base for advance or retreat. Also, as at Peng-hu the seas are high and the winds dangerous, doing battle was difficult and the government troops shrank from the task. Despite the defeat they suffered at the Central-left Battalion, the yi did not have the intention of withdrawing. Thus, Grand Coordinator Nan determined to cross to Peng-hu and attack their lair. Despatches were sent to Zhang-zhou and Quan-zhou requiring them to raise troops and buy ships. The Commandant Wang Meng-xiong and various other commanders were then selected and despatched. On the second day of the first month in the fourth year of the Tian-qi reign (20 Feb 1624), from Ji-ju they attacked Zhen-hai Port by surprise and, while attacking, also piled up stones to form a walled encampment. They repeatedly went out and engaged in vigorous attack and they took heads each time. The yi then withdrew to within the walls of Feng-gui. During that month, Grand Coordinator Nan twice sent naval forces in relief and also sent Gu Si-zhong, who had been given the brevet rank of military commissioner, and others, to lead the troops. They were to join forces at Zhen-hai in Peng-hu. Subsequently, they waged constant attacks but still the yi would not leave. In the fourth month, Military Commander Nan, taking into consideration that the troops were worn out and the resources exhausted, ordered the two maritime route circuit commanders to personally patrol the seas, and together with the two circuits of Zhang-nan and Xing-quan, supervise the despatch of the third naval relief force. Further, the Maritime Route Commander Sun Guo-zhen was sent to lead the Naval Force (水標) Mobile Corps Commander Liu and the Peng-hu Squad Leaders Hong Ji-yuan and Hong Ying-duo in sailing there. On the 28th day of the fifth month (13 Jul 1624), they arrived at the front of the Niang-ma Temple and began to assess the situation at the yi walls. Feng-gui faced the sea on three sides and it could only be reached along Shi-shang Yu. A deep channel had been dug and the yi ships were positioned on guard. They considered that the most appropriate course was to first attack the ships and then attack the walls, for if the ships were not in place, the fort could not be protected. Thus, it was agreed that on the 15th day of the sixth month (29 Jul 1624) the forces would press forward in attack. The yi were frightened that there might be spies among the merchants they had detained and thus expelled them all. Military Commander Nan also provided some plans and prepared reserve supplies of gunpowder and firearms. On that day, they moved the cannons on shore and the Commandant Wang Meng-xiong and so on were ordered to advance directly to Zhong-dun where they were to set up camp, spread out to cover the strategic places, cut off the route by which the yi went to draw water, and prevent [those on the ships] from coming on shore. Then they were to attack the walls on which the cannons were mounted and the yi ships. Further, the Squad Commander Hong Ji-yuan and others were sent to shift the relief troop ships and anchor them in the seas in front of the Zhen-hai encampment, so as to put direct pressure on the yi ships. When the winds were right, the water and land forces were to be advanced together. On the second day of the seventh month (15 Aug 1624), the yi felt that there was no option for them and they sent a yi chieftain with an interpreter to Zhen-hai encampment for a meeting and requested that an avenue of departure be opened for them. Maritime Route Commander Sun and Mobile Corps Commander Liu firmly demanded of the yi chieftain that the yi return home and swiftly hand back the territory, noting that if they were tardy they would be attacked and completely eliminated. On the third day (16 Aug 1624), our forces advanced against the yi walls and the troops were divided into three forces for a concurrent attack. The yi were extremely frightened and Niu-wen-lai-lu then raised the white flag. He sent an interpreter together with an yi chieftain to the Niang-ma Temple to submit their petition for pity, noting that Niu-wen-lai-lu would surrender to this office the documents which he had received from the king of Batavia, and stating that they had not engaged in evil. They begged that the troops' advance be delayed and that they be allowed to transport rice onto their ships, promising that they would then dismantle the walls and return home. Maritime Route Commander Sun was concerned that if the attack was made immediately, the yi would fight to the death. Thus, he thought that it would be safer to have them first return the territory and then catch them all in one net. He therefore allowed the request. On the 13th day (26 Aug 1624), the yi began dismantling the walls and loading the rice onto their ships. It was only the large three-storeyed building at the Eastern Gate where Gao-wen-lu formerly resided that they could not bear to destroy. Subsequently, Wang Meng-xiong and others were sent directly to Feng-gui and completely razed it. Thirteen of the yi ships fled towards the Eastern fan. One wing of our forces established a garrison to guard against their return. Then appropriate remedial measures were deliberated upon. In this campaign, hearts were united and efforts combined. The [civil] officials involved included the Regional Inspector Qiao [Cheng-zhao], the Provincial Administration Commissioners of the Left and Right You Han-long and Lu Wan-xue, the Surveillance Commissioner Zhu Shen-xiu, the Administration Vice Commissioner Zhu Yi-feng, the Surveillance Vice Commissioner Gao Deng-long, the Administration Vice Commissioners Sun Guo-zhen, Shen Xun and Yang Gong-gan, the Surveillance Vice Commissioners Shen Cui-zhen, Gui Shao-long and Hu Er-zao, the Assistant Surveillance Commissioner Ge Yin-liang, the Prefect Pan Shi-dao, the Vice Prefects Zhao Shu and He Shun-ling, the Judges Lin Dong-long and Jian Qin-wen, and the County Magistrates Li Can-ran, Yang Ting-zhao, Liu Si-lai and Chen Yi-rui. The military officials involved included the Grand Defender and Regional Vice Commander Xie Hong-yi, the Southern Route Regional Vice Commander Yu Zi-gao, the Mobile Corps Commander Liu Ying-long, the Assistant Commissioner Li Ying-shan, the Assistant Regional Commander Chen Wen-yang, the Mobile Corps Commander Zheng Jia-mou, the Assistant Commissioner Wu Cong-zhi, the Peng-hu Squad Leader Hong Ji-yuan, the Squad Leader Hong Ying-dou, the Commandant Wang Meng-xiong, the Camp Commander Zhang Hu-chen and the Squad Leader Chen Ying. It was appropriate that they be individually promoted and rewarded for their achievements, so as to console those who had exerted their efforts on the borders. It was proposed that the 12 live yi, the head chieftain Gao-wen-lu and the chieftain Er-lun-na be forwarded [to the capital].

Xi-zong (Liang): juan 47.4b-6a

Zhong-yang Yan-jiu yuan Ming Shi-lu, volume 128, page 2458/61

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Preferred form of citation for this entry:

Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/reign/tian-qi/year-4-month-10-day-18-0, accessed September 18, 2019